Steel, copper and aluminium account together for 50% of the appliances we have in our homes. To meet the increasing demand and reduce its carbon footprint, the sector takes a market-based approach to deliver a circular economy on the ground

The EU Single Market is the bedrock of the European economy. 30 years on from its foundation, the rules drafted to establish a harmonised footing look increasingly like a paper tiger, with so much common infrastructure still to be built. 

Edward Norton Lorenz’s most famous Butterfly Effect rests on the notion that one small occurrence can influence a much larger complex system. Fifty years later, a metaphorical application of this can be found in the EU’s proposed Carbon Border Adjustment Mechanism.

With appliances producing an unprecedented amount of information, their importance must not be underestimated. A distinction is needed between the data generated by the user and those who are instead internal processes of the machine to comply with the request.

The EU Data Act aims to facilitate access to and use of data. But what kind of data? Paolo Falcioni, APPLiA Director General, was invited to present at the European Forum for Manufacturing on the make or break factors of the EU Data Act.

From hand-held vacuum cleaners to toothbrushes, batteries play a fundamental role in the day-to-day operation of many of our home appliances. In order to ensure consumer safety, not all batteries in all appliances are readily removable from end users.