Where does the EU stand when it comes to the energy efficiency of home appliances?

Paolo Falcioni, APPLiA Director General and Giulia Zilla, APPLiA Environment & Energy Policy Manager were invited to speak at the Energy Regulation Conference, hosted by AEB Russia and share the EU experience on the progress made with regards to the Energy Efficiency Regulation in Europe.

Paolo Falcioni, APPLiA Director General and Giulia Zilla, APPLiA Environment & Energy Policy Manager were invited to speak at the Energy Regulation Conference, hosted by AEB Russia and share the EU experience on the progress made with regards to the Energy Efficiency Regulation in Europe.

Under the broader umbrella of the EU Green Deal, Europe is a global leader in the pathway towards decarbonisation. With the most recent Fit for 55 package setting the EU on the road to a greenhouse gas (GHG) emission reduction by 55% in 2030, ‘leaving no-one behind’ is the underlying narrative, highlighting the need for inclusiveness when it comes to the distributional implications of the energy transition. “ Establishing sustainable products as the norm in the EU is key to empower consumers towards more circular and informed choices,” stated Ms Zilla, shedding light on the importance of making circularity a culture for all. Significant progress is being made to ensure energy efficiency becomes a tangible reality in homes across the EU. To this end, it is fundamental for “European citizens to be part of the energy transition,” added Mr Falcioni. 

The introduction of the new energy label for certain product categories as from 1 March 2021 and its relative EPREL database are cornerstones of Europe's plan towards a circular economy. “EPREL is the first product database providing detailed information to consumers for all registered products, improving transparency on the appliances placed in the EU market and driving people towards more sustainable and informed decisions,” explained Ms Zilla.  

When looking at the European pathway towards a cost effective energy transition, it is key for legislation and standardisation to efficiently work together. In a nutshell, “legislation should set the requirements and standards should describe how to measure these requirements,” pointed Mr Falcioni, stressing how solid evidence for feasibility, proper measurability and repeatability make the perfect recipe in developing adequate standards. 

All in all, the home appliance industry supports the implementation of new energy efficiency regulations in Europe and strives to create a more sustainable, circular economy for all.